Black Female WWII Unit Hoping to get Congressional Honor

In this photo provided by the U.S. Army Women's Museum, members of the 6888th battalion stand in formation in Birmingham, England, in 1945. (U.S. Army Women's Museum via AP)
In this photo provided by the U.S. Army Women’s Museum, members of the 6888th battalion stand in formation in Birmingham, England, in 1945. (U.S. Army Women’s Museum via AP)

BOSTON (AP) — Maj. Fannie Griffin McClendon and her Army colleagues never dwelled on being the only Black battalion of women to serve in Europe during World War II. They had a job to do.

The 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion was credited with solving a growing mail crisis during its stint in England and, upon their return, serving as a role model to generations of Black women who joined the military.

But for decades, the exploits of the 855 members never got wider recognition — until now.

The Senate passed legislation that would award members of the battalion, affectionately known as the Six Triple Eight, with the Congressional Gold Medal.

The bill is awaiting action in the House but is already too late for most 6888 members. There are believed to be only seven surviving, including McClendon.

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Source: CBN, Michael Casey