S. C. Gov. Nikki Haley Criticized by Some for Promoting Christian-Themed Prayer Rally

South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley holds a news conference with fellow members of the Republican Governors Association at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce February 23, 2015 in Washington, DC. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images North America
South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley holds a news conference with fellow members of the Republican Governors Association at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce February 23, 2015 in Washington, DC. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images North America

Gov. Nikki Haley is set to headline a massive Christian-themed prayer rally at the North Charleston Coliseum next month that supporters say will bring attention to a nation in crisis.

But detractors say the governor’s dual role in promoting and speaking at the event pushes her toward the delicate line dividing church and state.

Up to 10,000 people are expected to attend The Response: a call to prayer for our nation, on June 13.

Similar rallies have been hosted previously by two of Haley’s closest political allies — Gov. Bobby Jindal of Louisiana and Gov. Rick Perry of Texas.

Both Republicans are part of the 2016 presidential mix and their appearances lent a political veneer — conservatives courting evangelical voters — to gatherings that resembled church services, featuring testimonials, shows of support toward the heavens and contemporary Christian praise music.

Haley agreed to take part in the upcoming event after a group of pastors visited her in Columbia.

She signed on because “faith has always been a source of strength for the governor and her entire family,” her press office said, adding that Haley is inviting South Carolinians “of all backgrounds and faiths to join her.”

Haley was born and raised in a Sikh family but later converted, joining her Methodist husband.

Critics, though, question the appropriateness of the governor appearing in a Response video promoting an event that, while not billed as exclusive to Christians, targets them and omits references to other beliefs.

The group’s web page states this “is the time for Christians to come together to call upon Jesus to guide us through unprecedented struggles, and thank Him for the blessings of freedom we so richly enjoy.”

Haley also issued an open invitation to the gathering written on her official governor’s office letterhead, not as a private citizen.

“In unity, we will pray for the strength and grace that we can only find when we turn our hearts and minds to the Lord. God bless,” it read.

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SOURCE: The Post and Courier
Schuyler Kropf

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