Ravi Zacharias’s Daughter Steps Down to Launch New Ministry

The CEO of Ravi Zacharias International Ministries (RZIM) has stepped down to start a new apologetics organization.

Sarah Davis led RZIM through her father Ravi Zacharias’s death, the posthumous investigation of his sexual abuse, and the breakup and dramatic downsizing of the global apologetics ministry. Now, she will go out on her own and launch a new ministry called Encounter.

According to incorporation papers filed with the state of Georgia, Encounter’s purpose is “carrying the Gospel invitation to individuals and engaging in their questions so that they may encounter the love of Christ and enter relationship with Him.” It will also engage “thoughtful individuals in Gospel conversations,” and work on “training and discipling messengers of Christ’s love for their spheres of influence.”

The mission is not that different from the one stated on RZIM’s incorporation papers filed in the state of Georgia in 1986, when Davis was 10. RZIM was founded for “proclamation of the Gospel throughout the world” and “assistance in the development of evangelical Christian leadership.”

Davis, now 46, declined to answer questions about the new ministry. An RZIM spokesperson did not return a request for comment.

Davis’s departure may pave the way for RZIM’s relaunch. The ministry announced in March it would regroup and rebrand as soon as a complete culture review was finished.

The exit appears to mark an end to the internal struggle over that culture review. RZIM leadership disagreed over whether the ministry bears any corporate responsibility for Zacharias’s sin and whether there was a need for a full examination of RZIM’s culture and practices to move forward.

According to multiple people familiar with inner conflict at RZIM, Davis contracted Guidepost Solutions to review the ministry’s structures, finances, and practices, including the handling of abuse allegations. The RZIM board of directors moved to limit the scope of the investigation and keep any findings from becoming public.

The Guidepost evaluation was aimed at identifying “areas of unhealth,” according to Davis, and help the ministry “do everything we can to prevent any kind of abuse in the future.”

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Source: Christianity Today