The Impact of Evangelical Women Against Trump

L-R: Katelyn Beaty, editor at large of Christianity Today and author of “A Woman’s Place: A Christian Vision for Your Calling in the Office, the Home, and the World.” (Photo courtesy of Katelyn Beaty); Christena Cleveland, associate professor of the practice of reconciliation at Duke University’s Divinity School. (Photo courtesy of Carolyn Scott Photography); AnaYelsi Velasco-Sanchez, the organizing and programs director for The Reformation Project and a signer of a petition opposing statements by GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump. (Photo courtesy of Matthew Vines)
L-R: Katelyn Beaty, editor at large of Christianity Today and author of “A Woman’s Place: A Christian Vision for Your Calling in the Office, the Home, and the World.” (Photo courtesy of Katelyn Beaty); Christena Cleveland, associate professor of the practice of reconciliation at Duke University’s Divinity School. (Photo courtesy of Carolyn Scott Photography); AnaYelsi Velasco-Sanchez, the organizing and programs director for The Reformation Project and a signer of a petition opposing statements by GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump. (Photo courtesy of Matthew Vines)

She never used his name. Or mentioned the recording that roiled so many of his evangelical Christian supporters.

But popular evangelical speaker and author Beth Moore clearly repudiated Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s remarks about women and the Christians who have defended him in a series of tweets on Oct. 9.

“Try to absorb how acceptable the disesteem and objectifying of women has been when some Christian leaders don’t think it’s that big a deal,” Moore tweeted.

And Moore isn’t the only prominent evangelical woman who has spoken out in the week since the release of the now-infamous “Trump tape,” a 2005 recording of Trump bragging about forcibly kissing and grabbing women and attempting sex with a married woman.

Authors Jen Hatmaker, Christine Caine, Trillia Newbell and Kay Warren; musicians Nichole Nordeman and Sara Groves; and Moody Radio host Julie Roys also have made news for their renunciations of the presidential candidate’s remarks.

“I think it took a comment from Trump that personally affected a majority of evangelicals for there to be a tipping point,” said Katelyn Beaty, editor at large of Christianity Today and author of “A Woman’s Place: A Christian Vision for Your Calling in the Office, the Home, and the World.”

“More than half of every church is women, and all those women are affected by comments about sexual assault.”

The Pew Research Center’s Religious Landscape Study backs that up: 55 percent of all evangelical Protestants are women, according to its findings.

And while “men who have a very clear institutional position of leadership” are viewed as spokespeople for evangelicalism, Beaty said, evangelicals themselves are more likely to look to writers and speakers, both men and women, as leaders.

Authors Jen Hatmaker, Christine Caine, Trillia Newbell and Kay Warren; musicians Nichole Nordeman and Sara Groves; and Moody Radio host Julie Roys also have made news for their renunciations of the presidential candidate’s remarks.

“I think it took a comment from Trump that personally affected a majority of evangelicals for there to be a tipping point,” said Katelyn Beaty, editor at large of Christianity Today and author of “A Woman’s Place: A Christian Vision for Your Calling in the Office, the Home, and the World.”

“More than half of every church is women, and all those women are affected by comments about sexual assault.”

The Pew Research Center’s Religious Landscape Study backs that up: 55 percent of all evangelical Protestants are women, according to its findings.

And while “men who have a very clear institutional position of leadership” are viewed as spokespeople for evangelicalism, Beaty said, evangelicals themselves are more likely to look to writers and speakers, both men and women, as leaders.

Comments by Beth Moore and other evangelical women — notably, white evangelical women — who have started to speak out over the past week give “women in the pews, your average churchgoer, permission to speak out politically in a way that they didn’t feel comfortable doing before,” Beaty said.

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SOURCE: Religion News Service
Emily Miller

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