Saeed Abedini Relied on Christian Faith During Three-Year Iranian Prison Ordeal

Naghmeh Abedini holds a necklace with a photograph of her husband, Saeed Abedini, on Capitol Hill on June 2, 2015 during a House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing with four people whose family members were being held in Iran. (Jacquelyn Martin, Associated Press)
Naghmeh Abedini holds a necklace with a photograph of her husband, Saeed Abedini, on Capitol Hill on June 2, 2015 during a House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing with four people whose family members were being held in Iran. (Jacquelyn Martin, Associated Press)

After her husband had been held for more than three years in Iran and beaten for refusing to recant his Christian faith, Naghmeh Abedini was finally able to tell her children that their father was headed home over the weekend.

“They were just excited. They couldn’t believe it,” she said after news broke that her husband, Idaho pastor Saeed Abedini, was on a flight back to the U.S. from Tehran.

Mr. Abedini, 35, is one of five Americans released by Iran as part of a prisoner swap between the two countries. He had been detained for compromising national security, presumably because of Christian proselytizing, in September 2012. He was sentenced in 2013 to eight years in prison.

The prisoner exchange was a key piece of a broader deal that also saw the Obama administration over the weekend lift $100 billion of economic sanctions on Iran in exchange for Tehran curbing its nuclear program.

President Obama praised the release of Mr. Abedini and other Americans and said it represented the culmination of years of behind-the-scenes diplomacy on the part of the U.S.

“Several Americans unjustly detained by Iran are finally coming home. In some cases these Americans faced years of continued detention. And I’ve met with some of their families. I’ve seen their anguish, how they ache for their sons and husbands. I gave these families my word — I made a vow — that we would do everything in our power to win the release of their loved ones. And we have been tireless,” the president said Sunday, adding that the families “finally got the news that they were waiting for.”

Other prominent U.S. political figures also celebrated the news.

“Praise God the prisoners are coming home, the Americans are coming home,” Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, a Republican presidential candidate, said during an interview on “Fox News Sunday.”

Iran also released Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian, who had been held more than 543 days on espionage and related charges.

“We are relieved that this 545-day nightmare for Jason and his family is finally over,” Washington Post publisher Frederick J. Ryan said in a statement.

Former U.S. Marine Amir Hekmati also was freed.

“It is hard to put into words what our family feels right now,” Mr. Hekmati’s family said in a statement.

Two other Americans, Nosratollah Khosravi-Roodsari and Matthew Trevithick, also are being returned home.

“Their cases were largely unknown to the world. But when Americans are freed and reunited with their families, that’s something that we can all celebrate,” Mr. Obama said.

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SOURCE: The Washington Times

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