Hillary Clinton Gets Personal About Her Christian Faith and the Bible at Iowa Town Hall Event

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton participates in a town hall forum hosted by CNN at Drake University on January 25, 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa. Clinton is in Iowa trying to gain support in front of the states Feb. 1 caucuses. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images North America)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton participates in a town hall forum hosted by CNN at Drake University on January 25, 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa. Clinton is in Iowa trying to gain support in front of the states Feb. 1 caucuses. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images North America)

Hillary Clinton is Methodist, but she rarely talks about her faith on the campaign trail.

On Monday, at a town-hall-style event in a school gymnasium here, Jessica Manning, 36, a high school guidance counselor from Pella, Iowa, told Mrs. Clinton that as a Catholic and a Democrat, she felt conflicted. She explained that she had called into a Catholic radio show to discuss whom to support in the presidential race, and the host advised that she back a candidate based on faith, rather than blindly supporting any one political party.

“I would say I am a Democrat because of my Christian values, but many of my friends would say they are Republicans because of their Christian values,” Mrs. Manning said. “So in these next few months as I am supporting you and defending you to my Republican friends,” she continued, “I am just curious, how you would say your beliefs align with the Ten Commandments and is that something that’s important to you?”

The question gave Mrs. Clinton a rare opportunity to speak at length about her views on Christianity and the Bible. Below is her complete response:

“Thank you for asking that. I am a person of faith. I am a Christian. I am a Methodist. I have been raised Methodist. I feel very grateful for the instructions and support I received starting in my family but through my church, and I think that any of us who are Christian have a constantly, constant, conversation in our own heads about what we are called to do and how we are asked to do it, and I think it is absolutely appropriate for people to have very strong convictions and also, though, to discuss those with other people of faith. Because different experiences can lead to different conclusions about what is consonant with our faith and how best to exercise it.

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SOURCE: The New York Times
Amy Chozick

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