Pro-Life Groups Condemn Canada Supreme Court’s Decision to Overturn Ban on Doctor-Assisted Suicide

Linda Jarrett, left, applauds Wanda Morris, right, CEO of Dying with Dignity, as she speaks to the media group’s offices in Toronto.
Linda Jarrett, left, applauds Wanda Morris, right, CEO of Dying with Dignity, as she speaks to the media group’s offices in Toronto.

Pro-life groups are denouncing a ruling Friday by Canada’s highest court to lift a ban on assisted suicide in limited cases.

“Today’s decision by Canada’s Supreme Court is the Roe v. Wade of euthanasia and a very dark day in Canada’s history,” Bradley Mattes, president of the International Right to Life Federation, said Friday. “Our vulnerable and chronically ill friends to the north will now be victimized by a pro-death ideology. Previous experience in other countries shows that safeguards mean nothing.”

The International Right to Life Federation, like other pro-life groups, seeks to achieve legal protection for all “innocent” human life from conception until “natural death.”

The Supreme Court of Canada unanimously ruled in Carter v. Canada that assisted suicide is permissible in specific circumstances, overturning a 1993 decision that forbade assisted suicide because of the government’s obligation to protect vulnerable people.

The decision said competent adults with “grievous and irremediable medical conditions” including illness, disease or disability that cause them “intolerable” suffering may consent to ending their lives.

The government has a year to bring its regulations into compliance with the ruling.

The specified restrictions did not comfort some organizations.

This is a “terrible decision,” Alex Schadenberg, executive director of the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition, told LifeSiteNews.

“Legalizing assisted suicide will create new paths of abuse of elders, people with disabilities and other socially devalued people. The scourge of elder abuse in our culture continues to grow,” he told the pro-life news site.

LifeSiteNews said Canada is joining other assisted suicide jurisdictions, such as Switzerland, the Netherlands and Belgium, as well as the states of Oregon and Washington.

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SOURCE: Cheryl Wetzstein
The Washington Times

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