Ex-Police Officer Who Killed 2 Daughters and 3 Dogs Before Killing Himself Left 6-Page Suicide Note

Harrison police Chief Anthony Marraccini, center, joined by Mayor Ron Belmont, right, gives a news conference Monday, Feb. 23, 2015, on the suicide of retired White Plains officer and the killing of his two daughters on Saturday, Feb. 21, 2015 at Harrison police headquarters. (Photo: Tania Savayan, The (Westchester County, N.Y.) Journal News)
Harrison police Chief Anthony Marraccini, center, joined by Mayor Ron Belmont, right, gives a news conference Monday, Feb. 23, 2015, on the suicide of retired White Plains officer and the killing of his two daughters on Saturday, Feb. 21, 2015 at Harrison police headquarters.
(Photo: Tania Savayan, The (Westchester County, N.Y.) Journal News)

The recently retired White Plains police officer who killed his two sleeping daughters, himself and three dogs Saturday left a five- to six-page note behind “indicating the killings were premeditated,” the local police chief said.

Harrison police Chief Anthony Marraccini said the note described Glen Hochman’s actions and told his wife, Anamarie DiPietro-Hochman, what she “needed to do to get things in order for the family.”

The girls — Alissa, 17, and Deanna, 13 — apparently had both already been fatally shot in the head in their rooms of the Harrison, N.Y., home when Hochman wrote the note sometime after 2 a.m. Saturday.

While it’s unclear exactly when Hochman wrote the note, “he did indicate in the letter that the two girls were taken away” and explained why he had done so, Marraccini said at a briefing with reporters Monday. He would not be more specific.

The horrific crime came to light Saturday afternoon when Alissa’s boyfriend went to the house at the request of Hochman’s wife and discovered Hochman dead of an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound in the garage, the police chief said.

The teen apparently first called DiPietro-Hochman, who had been away on an overnight trip to a casino with the couple’s eldest daughter and was just driving back into town. A friend riding in the car overheard the conversation and was the first to call 911; shortly thereafter the boyfriend, who had left the house, called as well.

Three officers responding to the home found the girls’ bodies, the chief said.

DiPietro-Hochman had gone to the Harrison police station Friday saying she wanted to document a verbal dispute the couple had the day before over an $80 cellphone bill. But she did not report “any threats of physical violence” and did not want the matter pursued by police, Marraccini said.

The couple had discussed separating last month and the wife made the report at the advice of a friend, the chief said. The couple had no known history of domestic violence and there was no indication Hochman “would do such a thing,” he said.

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SOURCE: Steve Lieberman
The (Westchester County, N.Y.) Journal News

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