After ‘Selma’ Snub, Civil Rights Leaders Plan to Protest Oscars Ceremony

Actor Domingo Colman, British actor David Oyelowo, director Ava DuVernay and British actor Tom Wilkinson arrive for the European premiere of the film 'Selma' in London on January 27, 2015. The film starring David Oyelowo and directed by Ava DuVernay is based on the 1965 Selma to Montgomery voting rights marches led Martin Luther King in the US.  JACK TAYLOR/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Actor Domingo Colman, British actor David Oyelowo, director Ava DuVernay and British actor Tom Wilkinson arrive for the European premiere of the film ‘Selma’ in London on January 27, 2015. The film starring David Oyelowo and directed by Ava DuVernay is based on the 1965 Selma to Montgomery voting rights marches led Martin Luther King in the US.
JACK TAYLOR/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

A group of African-American civil rights leaders plan to hold a protest in Hollywood outside Sunday’s Oscars show, where all of this year’s 20 acting nominees are white, AFP reports.

Earl Ofari Hutchinson, head of the L.A. Urban Policy Roundtable group, says the purpose of the demonstration is to draw attention to Hollywood’s diversity problem. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which awards Oscars, is comprised of voting members who are overwhelmingly white and an average age of 60, the report says.

“The goal of the protest is to send a message to the Academy, send a message to Hollywood, send a message to the film industry,” Hutchinson says, writes AFP. “And the message is very simple: you don’t reflect America; your industry doesn’t reflect America. Women, Hispanics, African-Americans, people of color (are) invisible in Hollywood.”

Some of this year’s snubs include Britain’s David Oyelowo, who was widely praised for his role as Martin Luther King Jr. in Selma. The film’s director Ava DuVernay, was also left out, though the movie is among eight picture nominees, the report notes.

After an uproar over the lack of black Oscar nominees in 2015, the Academy Award’s first African American president, Cheryl Boone Isaacs, said she was encouraged to accelerate reforms to make the awards more inclusive.

“Personally, I would love to see and look forward to [seeing] a greater cultural diversity among all our nominees in all of our categories,” she said at the time, the report notes.

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Source: The Root | 

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